Doctor Who: Dark Eyes 4 Review

So, here we are. Over 2 years since the first series was released, we’ve reached the end of another era for the Eighth Doctor. It’s been a great and epic journey, full of adventure, darkness and emotion. The final series had a lot to live up to, and now that I’ve finally listened to it, did it live up to my incredibly high expectations (especially since I found it would be written by John Dorney and Matt Fitton, two of my favourite writers at Big Finish right now)? Hell yes. Here’s my episode-by-episode review.

(NOTE: while this review avoids spoilers, it certainly helps to have listened to the first 3 seasons first, and is definitely recommended for enjoying the full story, particularly for the final episode that wraps the whole story up. For buying the complete series, click on the following link: http://www.bigfinish.com/ranges/released/doctor-who—dark-eyes )

A Life in the Day

After the grim and epic darkness we had with Dark Eyes 3, A Life in the Day’s little story seems not only slightly more familiar but also wonderfully refreshing. With so many plot threads and arcs to resolve from the previous 3 seasons, it almost seems an odd way to begin the story, even with the way it ties into the arc of the season at least with the Doctor and Liv being hunted, but it fits in quite nicely. It’s a nice glimpse of Eight, after the sheer grimness he’s dealt with in recent years – since before Dark Eyes began, in fact – to be back to being his happy, stupid self once more: the kind of Doctor who gets excited about a brand new pair of shoes, lies terribly and gets terribly distracted. There have been times, especially early on, when McGann’s incarnation reminded me greatly of Tom Baker’s incarnation, particularly during the Douglas Adams era, and along with his heroism and how much he gets pushed to the edge at times, his childlike innocence and happiness at the little things is something I’ve always enjoyed.

What I really enjoyed about this story is that it’s a great fresh take on an old science fiction trope (which I won’t spoil here) that’s both clever and provides a great emotional core to the story, particularly to the Eighth Doctor’s current companion Liv. From her first appearance in 7th Doctor story Robophobia, Nicola Walker has been fantastic as Liv Chenka, and here she gets a really fantastic story for her character, seeing the contrast of her in the setting of early 20th century Earth and how it takes a lot for her to adjust to, as well as a really great emotional story for her character that leads to some brilliant drama.

This episode is a fantastic opening to the season, and is a great example of what I love about Big Finish’s stories: it combines some of the great science fiction ideas that we often saw in the best classic series stories, with the fantastic emotion of the new series. 5/5

The Monster of Montmatre

This is a story of two halves. The first half begins like your standard pseudo-historical Doctor Who episode: a beautiful historical setting, filled with colourful characters and criminals while not only providing a distinctly Whovian take on an old story (in this case, Moulin Rouge), but also including an alien horror that stalks the streets. Like A Life In The Day, this episode not only feels like very familiar territory but works very well because of it. The imagery of Eight and Liv mingling with some criminals like a couple of private investigators is fantastic, and really starts off the story well.

The second half, however, is where the arc really starts to kick in. I won’t go into too much detail how, but again, it leads into some great imagery, particularly towards the end, and the return of certain characters and plot threads are nicely handled.

It’s a pretty good episode, but it’s a testament to the quality of the episodes surrounding it that it’s my least favourite of the set – while it’s a great story, it’s not quite as emotional or as epic as the episodes surrounding it. However, it’s definitely an enjoyable listen, and really kicks off the season into high gear. 4/5

Master of the Daleks

Oh, I’ve mentioned before how much I love that title, haven’t I? God bless you guys at Big Finish for giving us such great titles. You know, it’s only recently occurred to me that there’s not a single story title in the TV series – both classic and new, shockingly – that have the word “Master” in them. Not a single one. There’s countless Dalek stories that actually end in “of the Daleks”, a couple of stories with “of the Cybermen”, and even the Autons, with only 4 TV appearances, have “Terror of the Autons” (ironically the Master’s first story). But nothing for the Master, not even a pun. (Admittedly, it probably doesn’t help that at least half the time, maybe even MOST of the time, his/her part in the story is mostly kept as a surprise until the shock/dumb cliffhanger. (The difference between ‘shock’ and ‘dumb’ of course is how well it’s done – for a genuine shock, see Utopia; for pure dumb, see Time-Flight.)) So god bless Big Finish for giving us a number of stories with his name in the title: Master, Mastermind, Eyes of the Master and Masterplan.

But this title? Master of the Daleks? A title like that has a lot to live up to. Oh, we’ve had a team-up between the two arch-nemesis before, of sorts, in Frontier in Space, but that wasn’t until the final 10 minutes, which was mostly designed to lead into Master-free story, Planet of the Daleks. A story with a title like this promises something much more full-on, and hopefully much more epic. We get exactly that, and a whole lot more.

Now, it’s difficult to go into this one without giving too much away, especially since it links so heavily into the overall arc, but I’m certainly going to try. First thing’s first: Alex MacQueen. Ever since first playing the role for Big Finish in 2012, he’s been absolutely brilliant as the Master. A really fun incarnation that, yes, definitely has echos of the more recent ones on TV such as John Simm and Michelle Gomez, but is also entirely his own. He’s a sadistic and deliciously evil incarnation that really, really takes pride in his work, and after his involvement in Dark Eyes 2 and 3, it’s a joy to hear him once again.

There’s also plenty of great dialogue that’s absolutely hysterical to listen to, particularly when it comes to his alliance with the Daleks. The best part of this whole relationship is that, when you’ve got two of the most devious and dangerous foes of the Doctor working together, everyone knows what will happen. The Master, the Daleks and especially anyone who’s watched or listened to even one of their stories knows the obvious: that they’re going to betray each other. (One of my favourite lines of dialogue from the story has the Dalek Strategists calculate the probability that the Master will betray them as being ‘one hundred per cent’. Not gonna lie, I genuinely laughed at that.) It’s just a matter of when and how. And that’s part of the real fun of this story, as you wonder who’s going to betray who first. When it does happen, of course, it leads to some epic awesomeness that really shows off how fantastic Big Finish are at telling the kind of stories that fandom want to hear while still being stories that are actually great in their own right.

But it’s not just the Master and the Daleks in this story – oh no! We also get the Sontarans thrown in, as well, played by the brilliant Dan Starkey, who’s pretty much a veteran at playing the species by now, both from his various appearances in the new series (and I’m not gonna lie, while I’d love for another villainous Sontaran story to show up on TV, I really love his performance as Strax) as well as several other Big Finish audios. Naturally, he’s also great here, and adds even more awesome greatness, particularly during the epic climax of the story.

There’s a lot more to it than that, though. While I’m not going to say why, there’s a major emotional element that’s incredibly important, not just to this story but also to the whole season, particularly the finale. Introducing and fleshing out this part of the plot is beautifully done, and it really lets you know that, as much as this episode explores a really, really, really bloomin’ awesome idea as the Master and the Daleks and the Sontarans in one full-on episode, it’s also a reminder that the story of Dark Eyes really is approaching its end.

John Dorney really is one of my favourite writers at Big Finish (then again, there’s quite a large number of favourite writers I have, if I’m honest, but that’s down to just how great Big Finish truly is), and it’s precisely for stories like this that are the reason why. Because for a story involving the Master, the Daleks, Sontarans, and a lot of important story elements that have to be tied up or developed enough to lead into the finale to a 16 episode epic, it can be very, very easy to just leave us with a complete mess. Instead, we get another classic example of what Big Finish does best when it comes to Doctor Who: give us stories that are big, epic, emotional, fun and brilliant to listen to, sometimes in just one single episode. Not just as great as the best of the TV series but even better. 5/5

Eye of Darkness

So this is it. The grand finale. After 4 series, this is where the story ends, and like Master of the Daleks, expectations were pretty darn high. Does it live up to them? Definitely.

The story makes great use of an important part of Who mythology to set the scene, using the setting to slowly put the pieces into place. Major characters and enemies return from previous series, leading to one final confrontation, and one heartbreaking ending.

Storywise, I loved it, even if there were a number of elements like returning characters and some really complex use of time travel that made it just a little bit hard to follow, at times. If I’m honest though, for me, that’s not a complaint, as it really adds a great bonus to listening to the series from scratch all over again and seeing how much the ending was foreshadowed and hopefully getting my head around all the timey-wimey pieces of it. But beyond that, the final few scenes were really emotional to listen to. Eight is the Doctor that I always feel the most sorry for, as I can’t think of any other incarnation who lost as much as he did. Sure, Ten had his fair share of misery, but he didn’t lose half as much as what Eight did. Heck, by the end, he even gave up being the Doctor! As always, Paul McGann really sells how heroic his Doctor tries to be, even when failure is inevitable, as well as what happens when he deals with the consequences afterwards.

This final episode is a finale with real emotional weight, although that’s unsurprising – Matt Fitton is gifted at those kinds of stories, particularly ones that have huge impact on the mythology. With stories like The Wrong Doctors, Afterlife, Signs & Wonders, Return of the Rocket Men, Luna Romana, and a great deal of the Dark Eyes stories, including the whole of season 3, it’s no surprise that he’s been tasked to wrap the whole story up. He’s written a number of other stories for Big Finish too, something I’m continually impressed by considering how few years he’s been writing for Big Finish. This story, particularly the final moments, is up there with his best. 5/5

It’s sad to know that a series as great and ambitious as Dark Eyes has ended, but really great to know that it did so on a high. And while I look forward to Doom Coalition, I’m glad that it’s going to be a long wait for it – not just because I plan on re-listening to the whole epic from scratch as soon as I can, but the ending of Dark Eyes 4 left me so emotionally wrecked that I’m glad it gives me a break from my favourite Doctor for a while. I haven’t felt like that since To The Death, and while this story isn’t quite as devastating or brutal (but seriously, what story is? Bloody hell, Nicholas Briggs, George R.R. Martin treats his characters with more mercy than you did with that story!), this is still gonna leave its mark on Big Finish mythology in a truly memorable way. And I can’t say much higher praise than that.

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